Constitutional Fairyland

Another week, a new harvest of insane Democratic pre-electoral hobby horses. Various of the numberless swarm of presidential aspirants in that party have glibly chimed in with their views of how to modify American government to assure a permanent “progressive” majority. Gathering steam now are absurd ideas to side-step the Electoral College, pack the Supreme […]

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Les Macronables?

The late Chinese Premier Chou en-Lai is reputed to have said in 1971 that it was “too soon” to assess the impact of the French Revolution. Whatever the truth of that epigram, it is certainly too soon to know how important the events unfolding daily in France will become. My recent trip to Paris, however, […]

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George H.W. Bush and the Failure of American Foreign Policy

Amidst the lavish praise for the late president, George H.W. Bush, allow me to offer a contrarian view. As we learned from the funeral of the non-president, John McCain, the leftist media has rarely met an ineffective Republican politician they didn’t want to celebrate when he passed, no matter what they’d said about him during […]

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‘But, Kavanaugh!’ NeverTrump’s Awakening

The headline was a stunner: “For Once, I’m Grateful For Trump.” Even more shocking was the column’s author: New York Times columnist Bret Stephens. At great risk of alienating his Trump-hating readership at the Times, Stephens carefully explained why he is relieved a man he detests now sits in the Oval Office. From evidence-free accusations […]

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The Genocidal Elite, Part III: The Trail of ‘White Tears’

Sarah Jeong and her defenders in the media truly have given America a gift. Where once it was only dark speculation that media elites, at best, are ambivalent toward openly genocidal and bigoted statements about white Americans, now we are certain that these sentiments exist. We know, too, that the most common defense of these […]

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Faster Feiler, Faster!

The Feiler Faster Thesis posits that the pace of social change is accelerated by the increasing rapidity of the technology used by journalists to report the news, which whets the public’s appetite for more and even faster news, thus in effect creating even more news. By turns vicious and virtuous, it’s a cycle of news-and-response […]

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The NeverTrump Dilemma

After “CBS Evening News” anchor Walter Cronkite said he no longer trusted America’s leaders regarding the Vietnam War, President Lyndon Johnson supposedly remarked, “If I’ve lost Cronkite, I’ve lost Middle America.” A month later, on March 31, 1968, Johnson stunned the nation by dropping his re-election bid. So should President Trump and the Republican Party […]

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The Dream and the Nightmare of Globalization

After World War II, only the United States possessed the capital, the military, freedom, and the international good will to arrest the spread of global Stalinism. To save the fragile postwar West, America was soon willing to rebuild and rearm war-torn former democracies. Over seven decades, it intervened in proxy wars against Soviet and Chinese […]

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As the Wiseguys Turn: McCabe, Comey, and the FBI Boys

Back in the heyday of the New York City mafia, the wiseguys used to gather at the Ravenite Social Club in Manhattan’s Little Italy, a place on Mulberry Street that John Gotti and the Gambino crime family used as their informal headquarters. Despite Gotti’s best efforts to keep the cops away, the FBI managed to […]

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Politics, the Arts, and ‘The Fiery Angel’

In my new book, The Fiery Angel, out this week from Encounter Books, I make the following contention: that the arts have more to teach us about foreign and public policy than all the schools of government put together. “Homer,” I write, “has more to teach us about governance than Harvard, and always will.” To Homer, I […]

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